American College of Surgeons and Arizona Health Care Leaders Share Successes, Identify Areas of Improvement in Surgical Quality Improvement Programs

CHICAGO (November 11, 2013) – On Friday, November 8, The American College of Surgeons (ACS) hosted the ACS Surgical Health Care Quality Forum Arizona, the 14th program in a series of events to drive national discussions on effective quality improvement methods that surgeons, physicians, and hospitals are using to improve patient safety and reduce costs. [Read More]

Improving Outcomes Key to ACA’s Mission to Bend the Cost Curve of Health Care, Head of American College of Surgeon’s Research and Optimal Care Tells National Journal Forum

WASHINGTON, DC (October 4, 2013): In the midst of a federal shutdown stemming from lawmakers’ disagreement over the fate of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), the impact of the ACA was explored at a National Journal half-day forum Thursday that featured a variety of key health care decision makers, including American College of Surgeons’ Research and Optimal Care Director Clifford Ko, MD, MS, MSHA, FACS. [Read More]

5 questions to ask before surgery

CNN.com

Sometimes, the questions you ask yourself are the hardest to talk about with your doctor.

Dr. Karl Bilimoria, a surgeon at Northwestern University and the American College of Surgeons, advises that identifying and addressing these questions may help ensure a healthy recovery after an operation.

In August, Bilimoria and researchers at the American College of Surgeons released an online tool that allows patients, in collaboration with their doctors, to estimate what their risks may be in undertaking an operation. [Read More]

Online Calculator Predicts Risk of Surgical Complications

Yahoo! Health

Making difficult decisions about whether to have a potentially risky surgery just got easier for doctors and patients.

The American College of Surgeons (ACS) has unveiled a new surgical risk calculator. This online tool allows anyone with a computer and an Internet connection to punch specific information into a Web page to find out potential outcomes before ever going under the knife. [Read More]

New ACS NSQIP® Surgical Risk Calculator Offers Personalized, Accurate Estimates of Surgical Complications to Patients and Surgeons

Journal of the American College of Surgeons study reports that new web-based tool effectively aids the informed decision-making process by educating patients about their operations; its use may become a quality reporting requirement for surgeons

CHICAGO (August 14, 2013) — The new American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP®) Surgical Risk Calculator is a revolutionary new tool that quickly and easily estimates patient-specific postoperative complication risks for almost all operations, according to research findings appearing online in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons. The study will be published in a print edition of the Journal later this year. [Read More]

New Study Finds Overall Hospital Quality Performance Differs When Comparing Cancer Operations with Noncancer Operations

Surgeons say quality measurement should consider cancer surgical procedure indication when rating hospital outcomes

SAN DIEGO (July 18, 2013): New research findings released earlier this week at the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP®) National Conference in San Diego, Calif., show that hospital quality measurement specific to cancer versus noncancer care provides a more accurate assessment of a hospital’s overall quality performance. [Read More]

Surgical Patients’ Mortality Rates Drop at ACS NSQIP Hospitals in California

New study finds ACS NSQIP hospitals have consistently better surgical outcomes than non-ACS NSQIP hospitals

SAN DIEGO (July 15, 2013) — A new study evaluating surgical outcomes at California hospitals enrolled in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP®) found surgical patients at ACS NSQIP hospitals had significantly reduced mortality rates compared with non-ACS NSQIP hospitals. These findings were presented Sunday, July 14, 2013 at the ACS NSQIP National Conference, taking place July 13-16 in San Diego, Calif. [Read More]

Researchers find ACS NSQIP® data is more accurate than administrative data for tracking 30-day hospital readmissions among colorectal surgical patients

NSQIP database analysis shows that 30 percent of hospital readmissions could be prevented, according to new Journal of American College of Surgeons study

Chicago (June 18, 2013): With Medicare penalties on hospitals with higher-than-expected rates of 30-day readmissions expected to rise in 2014, more hospitals are evaluating the most accurate methods for tracking readmissions of patients. A new study appearing in the June issue of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons finds that the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program® (ACS NSQIP®) led to more accurate data tracking than another popular database, the University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC), for tracking 30-day hospital  readmissions among colorectal surgical patients. [Read More]

Surgeon-Driven Quality Effort Slashes Complications, Costs

HealthLeaders
When Brian J. Daley, MD, FACS, chief of trauma at University of Tennessee Medical Center, talks about success in improving surgical outcomes, he inserts a joke early in the conversation.

“You know, if you ask a surgeon to name the three best surgeons they know, they have a problem coming up with two other names,” he quips. Often, he says, “surgeons think everyone else is having a complication, but not them.” [Read More]

Hospitals working together to reduce surgical complications

CT Mirror
Connecticut hospitals traditionally considered competitors have been quietly teaming up to share techniques to reduce surgical infections and complications.

The idea is to improve patient care and efficiency in a landscape of skyrocketing health care costs and pressure from the federal Affordable Care Act to improve performance. [Read More]